Repairing tips: how to replace a broken floor tile

Broken Floor Tile

One of the last phases of building an amazing home is flooring and depending on de flooring type, your home will have a characteristic finish that marks your style. As you may know, one of the best flooring types that can make you express your internal artist is ceramic tile. The variety of colors and textures is great and will give you great material to develop a floor worth watching, caring and stepping on.

Sadly, no matter how loving and caring you could be with your ceramic tiles, accidents may occur and a heavy object can break or damage seriously one of the tiles; but looking on the bright side, replacing a broken tile is not as hard as one can imagine, in fact, is one of the many home “do-it-yourself” project anyone can tackle. So follow the read and learn how to replace a broken floor tile by yourself.

First, gather all the tools and materials you’re going to need, which are:

  •         New tile
  •         Level
  •         Cold chisel
  •         Sponge
  •         Scraper
  •         Drill
  •         Grout
  •         Grout shaper
  •         Grout raker
  •         Hammer
  •         Gloves
  •         Goggles
  •         Tile adhesive

Now that you’re set, start by grabbing the grout raker and remove the grout from the borders of your broken tile. This is needed to isolate the tile of the rest of the flooring and will help you to avoid damaging other tiles while attempting to replace other. Now, grab your safety goggles, because it’s time to start the removal.

First you’ll have to drill a series of holes into the damaged or broken tile. You can draw some patterns with the holes if you want, the main goal is to weaken the structure of the tile and ease the appearing of fractures within it. Now, release some tension with the chisel and the hammer. Start chiseling the tile from the borders and keep doing it until the tile is completely removed. Remember to wear your protective gloves while doing this step.

It’s time to get rid of the old and hardened tile adhesive, as your tile is now removed, the surface will reveal the old adhesive you’ll need to scrape in order to have a surface as smooth and flat as possible.

Grab the new tile adhesive and apply it uniformly on the reverse of the replacement tile, position it carefully in the empty space and use the help of the level to check if it flushes with the surrounding tiles. Wait a few minutes to allow the adhesive to dry and then grout the borders of the new tile to fill the empty space you drew with the raker on the first step. Be ready to take your sponge to clean any excess of grout that might remain and then let it soothe and dry.

There you go: a project that didn’t cost you much money because you did it by yourself. Now you can enjoy your flooring as if it was brand new.

Safety First: Home Improvement Tips

Safety First: Home Improvement Tips

There are few sensations that compare to the freedom felt by doing an improvement project on your home by yourself. Even when almost anyone can tackle most of easy jobs to do at home in order to make an upgrade or repair in a space of your own, there’s a reason for the existence of professionals.

Stay safe!

Every project that includes working with power tools, hazardous materials, sharp blades, standing on heights, wiring or gas piping is synonym of risks and safety is not something to be taken for granted. But the goal of this article isn’t to discourage you from putting hands to work but to give you the best tips in order to work on them the safest way possible, so pay attention.

  • Don’t bite more than you can chew: This popular saying applies to those projects that might seem overwhelming, or those that don’t let you work comfortably. It’s understandable, because hanging a portrait with a nail is different to repair a broken clay tile on your roof, so leave the big projects to the professionals.
  • Be tidy: This includes having an organized working area (with untangled cords, sharp and power tools stored properly and hazardous materials as well) and the proper outfit (work boots, gloves and thick sturdy clothing will protect you, safety glasses are a must-wear if you’re working with cutting or power tools and the same goes to hard helms if working under a construction).
  • Laziness is not an option: This doesn’t refer to physical laziness but to mental one that can appear when it comes to reading a manual. No one knows the cautions one has to be aware of than the manufacturer of a power tool, and there is where they are written.
  • Be sharp: This tip goes to your drill bits, cutters and blades. A dull one can be dangerous as they need extra force.
  • Stay firm: When working on a ladder, make sure its base is set on a firm and flat surface and to not lay your weight in one of the sides.
  • It’s always nice to think twice: A bunch of situations might give you a sign that this project might be too much risk and unworthy to take. For example, it’s impossible to work on a roof when there’s bad weather approaching your home.Don’t work with gas pipes if you’re not an expert, there is flammable fluid running through those things, so the safest move is check for leaks (without a flame!!) and call a professional.
  • Avoid electrical shocks: If you’re working with electricity, turn it off on the main panel before starting and always employ a tester to check if there’s current flowing through the piece of wiring you’re working on. Also, protect your tools with GFCI receptacles.

Expect something to happen: Even when we’re trying our best to avoid catastrophes, it’s better to count with a complete first aid kit or a fire extinguisher at hand.

How to Do Home Electrical Repairs: Tips

DIY Electrical Repair

Having a house represents a great responsibility, there are so many vital things that could be damaged and need repairs. Of course, there are jobs that need to be done by professionals, but there are others that could be done by every homeowner with just a few tips that could save them time, money and headaches. Before putting your hands into dangerous things, be aware that safety will always need to be first.

Safety first!

If you’re repairing an electrical household appliance,unplug it or cut the power with the switches of the main panel if unplugging is impossible. Be sure to buy the parts you really need, a little bit of assistance from the hardware store employees is quite handful here as they might orientate you in buying the right wiring and parts, the equipment intended to outside projects is not the same one that you’ll need for indoors ones, for example. And remember, ask for help if you’re not and expert, leaving your pride aside might avoid you some electrical shocks or even fires.
Of the most common problems that might represent a risk to your home but you can handle by yourself there are broken outlets. Replacing them is as easy as following the next steps:

  • Turning off the power at the main circuit panel.
  • Remove the old outlet cover.
  • Check the conditions of your cables. If they seem to be in bad condition, cut the damaged part and strip about 2 cm of your insulation to make new and healthy contacts.
  • Bend the stripped wires to form a U shape. Hook the ground wire to the ground screw in order to tighten it. It is advisable to put the hook in the same direction of the tightening of the screw as this will create a stronger connection.
  • Apply the same technique used previously to connect the white neutral wire to the neutral screws of the new outlet and the black wire to one of the brass screws.
  • Tuck the wiring into the box again and secure the new outlet with screws to the box with screws. It’s safer to put the ground slot on top.
  • Screw the cover of the outlet to leave it fixed to the wall.

Other easy-to-handle project you can do by yourself is changing a light socket. Even when a broken one is not that risky, it’s annoying to lack of light in any room. You can replace a socket the following way:

  • Roll out the bulb.
  • Check for power with a tester. If there’s none, the answer is replacing the socket.
  • Turn off the power.
  • Check the brass contact. If it was good, then unscrew the socket.
  • Apply the technique explained before to hook the cables to the new socket.
  • Roll a bulb in and test the power.

Be careful while doing your electrical repairs

Remember: don’t bite more of what you can chew. Leave big projects to the pros and have fun with the smaller ones.